Contact:
John Caher
New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services
(518) 457-8415, (518) 225-5240 (cell)
john.caher@dcjs.ny.gov

For immediate release: Thursday, May 20, 2010

DCJS Launches Podcast Library

Criminal justice programs available for download


The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services today launched a podcast library of free criminal justice programs on issues ranging from DNA to offender re-entry. All of the programs can be played from the DCJS website, downloaded to a computer, mp3 player or in-car computer or burned to a CD.

“It seems like we’re all on the run all the time these days, so DCJS created a public podcast library of educational programs that anyone can enjoy even when they are literally on the run,” said Acting Commissioner Sean M. Byrne. “But this is the tip of the iceberg. We intend to continually update our library with new podcasts on emerging criminal justice topics.”

Some of the podcasts were converted from “Criminal Justice Forum,” a series of television programs produced by DCJS for public access television. The programs have aired around the state and can be viewed on the DCJS website. Other programs were produced by or in partnership with the New York State Association of Chiefs of Police, which maintains a podcast library for law enforcement professionals at www.NYchiefs.org (click on “APB Podcasts”).

The following podcasts are currently available:


AMBER Alert Case Example
Mark Spawn, director of research, development and training for the New York State Association of Chiefs of Police, discusses an actual case in which the America’s Missing Broadcast Emergency Response (AMBER) system was used to find a Rockland County girl who had been abducted.

Missing Persons - Missing Child Cases
In this program, Mark Spawn interviews Ken Buniak, program manager for the DCJS Missing and Exploited Children Clearinghouse, about missing person and missing child cases.

Child Safety
Retired WRGB news anchor Jack Aernecke interviews Ken Buniak and Cindy Bloch of the Missing and Exploited Children Clearinghouse at DCJS about the steps parents can take to protect their children when they are away from home, or surfing the net in what should be the safety and security of their home.

Crime Victims
Tina Stanford, chairwoman of the New York State Crime Victims Board, is interviewed by Jack Aernecke about the board, the services it provides and the benefits available to victims of crime.

DNA
Acting Commissioner Sean Byrne and DCJS Deputy Commissioner and Counsel Gina L. Bianchi talk with Mark Spawn about the state’s databank. Current New York law permits authorities to collect a DNA sample from only 46 percent of the people convicted of crime – despite the fact that offenders linked to crimes using the DNA Databank had an average of 11 arrests and five convictions prior to their DNA-qualifying conviction.

Domestic Violence
Amy Barasch, executive director of the New York State Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence, is interviewed by Jack Aernecke about the agency and how it pursues its mission of fighting and preventing domestic violence.

Offender Re-entry
Jack Aernecke interviews Glenn Martin of the Fortune Society of the Vivian Nixon of the College and Community Fellowship. Both Mr. Martin and Ms. Nixon are former offenders who have made the successful transition from prison to society, and are now committed to helping others do the same.

Offender Re-entry: Coming Home, Staying Home
In this program, a team of students from Niagara Falls High School and Media Education Director Richard Meranto interviewed several men at the re-entry unit at the Orleans Correctional Facility and several on parole about the challenges to returning to their community.

Probation and Correctional Alternatives
Robert Maccarone, State Director of the Division of Probation and Correctional Alternatives, discusses alternatives to incarceration with Jack Aernecke.

The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services is a multi-function criminal justice support agency with a variety of responsibilities, including collection and analysis of statewide crime data; operation of the DNA databank and criminal fingerprint files; administration of federal and state criminal justice funds; support of criminal justice-related agencies across the state; and administration of the state’s Sex Offender Registry and a toll-free telephone number (1-800-262-3257) that allows anyone to research the status of an offender.

The New York State Association of Chiefs of Police was organized on November 30, 1901, in Rochester, New York and incorporated in 1957. It is a not for profit organization dedicated to serve the people of the State of New York in the maintenance of law and order and to support the more than 500 Chiefs of Police as they carry out the functions of their office. The primary objective of the Association is to achieve professional recognition, uniformity of operation and the advancement of the general welfare of the police profession through the education of its members.