Contact: Janine Kava, Press Office
New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services
(518) 457-8906 or (518) 275-5508 – cell
janine.kava@dcjs.ny.gov


For immediate release: Friday, Jan. 22, 2010

Law enforcement agencies in 29 counties share nearly $1 million to fight crime

“IMPACT Tools” grants support technology, intelligence-driven enforcement

Law enforcement agencies in 29 counties across the state will share nearly $1 million in grants to enhance crime-fighting initiatives and purchase new technology.

The state Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) last month awarded a total of $992,749 to 38 agencies – 35 police departments, two district attorney’s offices and one sheriff’s department – through its IMPACT Tools program. Tools grants are available to law enforcement agencies that do not participate in Operation IMPACT, the state’s program that targets 17 counties upstate and on Long Island reporting about 80 percent of the crime in the state outside of New York City.

This year, the IMPACT Tools grant program was supplemented by more than $500,000 in funding available through the federal American Reinvestment and Recovery Act. 

“Despite our state’s many fiscal challenges, Governor Paterson remains committed to providing local law enforcement with resources necessary to fight crime, and thanks to the Obama Administration and New York’s Congressional delegation, we have been able to expand those efforts,” Deputy Secretary for Public Safety Denise E. O’Donnell said. “We remain committed to working in partnership with local law enforcement to support efforts to make communities across the state safer.”

The majority of IMPACT Tools grants – 22 of the 35 awarded to police departments – will allow those agencies to make the switch from “ink and roll” fingerprints to digital technology, enabling them to comply with a mandate that all fingerprint submissions to the state’s fingerprint database at DCJS be made electronically as of this month. The state has invested more than $1.6 million to help local law enforcement comply with this mandate.

Agencies with digital fingerprint technology transmit fingerprints immediately upon arrest to DCJS, which in turn compares those prints to ones on file and provides the arresting agency with a positive identification and any past criminal history and warrant information in less than an hour. That information is crucial to determining how cases against arrested individuals proceed.

Agencies using the traditional “ink and roll” method send fingerprints to DCJS via surface mail, which often results in prints being analyzed, and information returned about individuals, days after arrests are made.

Agencies could either opt for technology that allows them to capture and transmit prints electronically or allows them to scan “ink and roll” fingerprint cards so they can be transmitted electronically to DCJS. Smaller departments with fewer annual arrests often opt for the less costly “card scan” technology. Cost of the technology also varies, depending on which vendor an agency selects to provide the equipment.

The grants also will provide departments with additional funding for investigations targeting drug, violent and Internet-based crime and warrant enforcement, and will allow agencies to purchase license plate reader (LPR) technology.

LPRs use specialized digital cameras to capture images of license plates – generally about one per second at speeds of up to 100 miles per hour – and compare them quickly to a large database, allowing law enforcement to quickly and accurately detect illegal vehicles on the roads. The following agencies received grants:

Long Island

  • Deer Park (town) Police Department (Suffolk County): $18,550 for license plate reader technology.

Hudson Valley

  • Elmsford (village) Police Department (Westchester County): $18,550 for license plate reader technology.
  • Haverstraw (town) Police Department (Rockland County): $25,000 to fund drug interdiction investigations.
  • Kent (town) Police Department (Putnam County): $18,550 for license plate reader technology.
  • Mamaroneck (town) Police Department (Westchester County): $18,550 for license plate reader technology.
  • New Paltz (town/village) Police Department (Ulster County): $29,453 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Stony Point (town) Police Department (Rockland County): $18,550 for license plate reader technology.
  • Tuxedo (town) Police Department (Orange County): $30,000 for digital fingerprint technology.

Greater Capital Region

  • Cobleskill (village) Police Department (Schoharie County): $29,935 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Hudson Falls (village) Police Department (Washington County): $30,000 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Niskayuna (town) Police Department (Schenectady County): $29,935 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Saratoga County District Attorney’s Office: $40,000 to fund a part-time prosecutor to handle drug cases.

North Country

  • Malone (village) Police Department (Franklin County): $29,935 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Ogdensburg (city) Police Department (Saint Lawrence County): $29,935 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Potsdam (village) Police Department (Saint Lawrence County): $30,000 for digital fingerprint technology.

Mohawk Valley/Central New York

  • Chittenango (village) Police Department (Madison County): $15,000 for digital fingerprint technology (card scan).
  • Norwich (city) Police Department (Chenango County): $33,098 for digital fingerprint technology.

Southern Tier

  • Bath (village) Police Department (Steuben County): $29,152 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Corning (city) Police Department (Steuben County): $30,000 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Elmira (city) Police Department (Chemung County): $20,000 for warrant enforcement.
  • Hornell (city) Police Department (Steuben County): $30,000 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Horseheads (village) Police Department (Chemung County): $30,000 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Port Dickinson (village) Police Department (Broome County): $10,000 for drug interdiction investigations.
  • Sidney (village) Police Department (Delaware County): $29,935 for digital fingerprint technology.

Finger Lakes

  • Canandaigua (city) Police Department (Ontario County): $25,481 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Lyons (village) Police Department (Wayne County): $33,048 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Newark (village) Police Department (Wayne County): $30,000 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Seneca Falls (village) Police Department (Seneca County): $29,152 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Yates County Sheriff’s Department: $16,850 to investigate instances of cybercrime.

Western New York

  • Albion (village) Police Department (Orleans County): $29,935 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Cheektowaga (town) Police Department (Erie County): $39,910 for drug interdiction investigations.
  • Corfu (village) Police Department (Genesee County): $18,550 for license plate reader technology.
  • Gates (town) Police Department (Monroe County): $10,560 to combat violent crime.
  • Lancaster (town) Police Department (Erie County): $35,200 for drug interdiction investigations.
  • Niagara (town) Police Department (Niagara County): $30,000 for digital fingerprint technology.
  • Wyoming County District Attorney’s Office: $10,000 for equipment to provide for video recording of custodial interrogations. Wyoming will join 40 other counties that have received funding from DCJS to provide for video recording; the agency has provided more than $1.5 million in funding available from the federal Byrne Justice Assistant Grant program for this initiative.

The IMPACT Tools grants are awarded competitively and DCJS received a total of 64 applications requesting more than $2.1 million.

The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services is a multi-function criminal justice support agency with a variety of responsibilities, including collection and analysis of statewide crime data; operation of the DNA databank and criminal fingerprint files; administration of federal and state criminal justice funds; support of criminal justice-related agencies across the state; and administration of the state’s Sex Offender Registry and a toll-free telephone number (1-800-262-3257) that allows anyone to research the status of an offender.